Mistakes are Expected

We are so excited to share our first guest post on The Unexpected Ever Afters blog. We hope you enjoy Sarah’s wonderful post, “Mistakes are Expected.” If you are interested in sharing your stories as a guest writer, please contact us at unexpected.ever.afters@gmail.com.


I can sometimes be a bit of a perfectionist. Whenever I am faced with a decision, big or small, I want to be sure I make the right one. There are times I know I’ve procrastinated because I’m honestly afraid of not making the best possible choice. 

Even writing this post took longer than it should have.

That doesn’t really work, though. When I delay and weigh every possible outcome, I still sometimes wish I’d done something different. Unfortunately, I also know firsthand that delaying decisions can lead to regret at not making them sooner.

A little while ago, I had to fix—well, add—a hem to one of my dresses. I’m not sure how it held together all these years without that, but it did. 

Anyway, when I got out my sewing machine, the little drawer of extra bobbins and needles and such was stuck open. As I was closing it, the little tool I’ve only known as “the seam ripper” caught my eye. This tiny hook of metal with a blade inside catches and cuts threads from a seam without damaging the fabric, and it came with the sewing machine. Like vacuum attachments, these things are included as part of the usual equipment.

It’s a tool designed to undo what the sewing machine does, and it’s just usual equipment.

I love that. I do. 

I love that one of the basic items included with a sewing machine is this seam ripper. It’s like the manufacturers know you’ll need it. 

It basically says, “Hey, you’re not perfect. You’ll need to redo this. Often. Often enough that this is a standard tool expected to accompany the machine. It’s included—no extra charge—because the work itself will be hard enough. Mistakes are expected.”

Of course, there are going to be significant decisions that will need extra time and consideration, but it’s helpful to remember that it’s impossible to get it exactly right every time. Approaching that with some grace and understanding will be necessary to keep going. 

The work itself will be hard enough.

Mistakes are expected.

Sarah lives and works just outside of Boston, Massachusetts. In her spare time, she can be found exploring the city and writing stories and posts for blogs like this one.

*photo credit: personal photo*

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